Frank Hardy Made My Photographs Two

Posts Tagged ‘1920’s

Pensacola Fire Department …

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IMG_1119 Firemen in Square_7x7_RTP_14 June 16_SFW

This is in the square at Palafox and Government Streets sometime back in the 1920’s.  That is the Escambia County Courthouse in the background.  Look at the facial expressions on the fire fighters … also look at all of the activity in the background.  Everyone is busy and going someplace.  Even though this is a black and white image ( toned actually ) it seems that black or some dark color is the predominant color for suits, dresses and cars back in the 1920’s.  As usual I have no clue who any of the fire fighters are or what they are doing, but it doesn’t matter.  Here is one more from a different direction …

 

Firemen in Park_7x7_RTP_11 June 16 _ SFW

Here you see the TT Wentworth Museum in the background, that at one time used to be the Pensacola City Hall.  Even I can remember going down to the City Hall back in the late 1960’s and up into the 1970’s and doing business there.  So it must have been in use up until the new City Hall down on Main Street was built back in the 1980’s.  I have some photos that I took when they were building the new City Hall over on my other blog that I have showing my photography.  If anyone knows anything about either of these two photographs, please feel free to comment.  Thanks again for looking and please check back … Frank

Cotton Pickers ….

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Cotton Pickers_15x9_25 May 16_SFW

This was taken back in the 1920’s by an unknown photographer.  I wish that I knew something about the guys in the photo or the photographer who made the image, but as usual, I know only what I see.  It looks as if it could have been in just another cotton field somewhere on Hwy 87 in north Santa Rosa County.  Maybe they are brothers, maybe two strangers who just met on their first day in the field, whatever the the case may be, they have a long, hot, hard day a head of them.  Notice that their bags trail another few feet once it touches the ground.  They look pretty fresh at this point, so I imagine that their day has just begun.  I read somewhere that pickers were only paid a dime for a full bag and on a good day they were lucky to fill two of these bags.  Twenty cents for eight to ten hours in the hot sun and one hundred degree heat.  That sounds , well, you know how that sounds … I wonder how many lined up to work on this day?  We see two men that did.  The cotton crop in this field looks thin.  Must not have had much rain this growing season.  My father used to tell me stories of him and his brother Ben going to visit their Aunt and Uncle in Pineapple Alabama.  My father was young, maybe eleven or twelve, and he would go out in the fields and pick cotton with all of the workers.  He loved it. Ben hated it.  Ben could not wait to get back to Pensacola.  I have horn that was given to him by his Uncle who would use the horn to call in the workers at the end of the day.  I am sorry to say that I did not take very good  care of horn, but I will photograph it and post a photo later.  Usually at this point in my post I would say something like … If you want to share your experiences picking cotton, we would love to hear them.  But, for some reason, I do not think that I would have many comments.  Thanks for looking, and if you like,  you can share experiences picking peas, string beans, radishes, etc, etc.  Or you could tell us about your backyard garden.  Again, thanks for looking … Frank

Bayou Texar …

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Bayou Texar _ RTP _ 1 July 15  SFW

This is Bayou Texar around 1920, if I had to make a guess.  I would also guess that this area would be south of the Cervantes Street Bridge.  The grass flats are still in the area and the oak trees on the bank are still there.  Someone had brought me this image to copy thirty years or more and they told me that it was a photo of their family.  The photo was in horrible shape and they did not want to spend the money to have the image restored, so I just copied the print and made copies.  I found the negative and scanned it, then worked it up in Photoshop in an hour or so.  And that is what you are seeing here.  I do not know who the photographer was, but it looks like an image that might have been created by Cottrell, who was located in downtown Pensacola at the time this photo might have been made.  But as usual, that is only a guess and I could be completely wrong.  I can not remember who brought this print to me either, it was such a long time ago.  I have been busy with other things the last month or so and have not posted much, but I have not forgotten this blog and plan to keep it going for some time in the future.  I have been posting to my Instagram account and here is a link.  I post everything from my personal images to photos that I have put on this blog.  I like the way Instagram works and the people that respond to my images are different than the ones that are just looking at blogs.  I have tried Twitter and have it linked to my blogs along with Facebook, but I do not really care for either one of those, especially Facebook.  That is it for today and I will be back with some new photos in several weeks.  Let me hear from you if you have any comments or questions and thanks again for looking … Frank

The West Florida History Center and University Archives …

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Maxi s  Liquor Store _ RTP_ 21 April 15_SFW

The above image of ” Maxey’s Liquors ” is by the photographer Cottrell taken back in the 1920’s.  You can find it in the West Florida History Center and University Archives out at the John C. Pace Library on the UWF campus.  You can find these images on line here and other images from the UWF archives.  These images have been scanned and are online for your browsing convenience.  The files are high-resolution and not just low-resolution scans for the internet.  I was really impressed with all that is out at UWF and the archives are located in the basement of the library.  Anyone is welcome to use the facility and I talked to Stephanie Johnson when I was there.  There are other people in this department if she is busy.  The above photo of Maxey’s Liquors was just one that caught my attention because this business was located on Palafox Street in downtown Pensacola about where the Tin Cow Restaurant is now located.  The L&L Pawn Shop next door was where my father used to have his wedding albums gold-stamped with the bride and groom’s name.  I can remember the inside of this store like it was yesterday.  Even though my father did not make theses images, I thought there would be readers of this blog would be interested in knowing that these archives are online and available to everyone.  The photo below is of Gilmore’s Furniture and Jewelery Store located on Palafox Street about where the Rex Theater was located before it was converted into a church / spiritual center …

 

Cottrell Collection - 308_ WIP_21 April 15_SFW

At some point, maybe the 1950’s, this business relocated to the 400 block of Garden Street.  I have an image somewhere on this blog that my father had made of the new Glimore’s building at night.  Just type ” Gilmore ” into the search area on this blog and the post should come up.  There are literally thousands of images on this UWF site from lots of various photographers and places.  I have a phone number ( 850-474-2794 ) for Stephanie Johnson out at the archive department if anyone has any questions or comments.  I knew that this archive was out there, but I had no idea how large it is and how easy it is to access.  There are a lot of people that are interested in local history and this is just one more place for them to go and research or just to view all of the images.  Thanks for looking and please check back … Frank

Pensacola Mardi Gras …

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IMG_1228 Pens Mardi Gras 2_RTP _SFW

Not sure if this Mardi Gras photo is from the 1920’s or 30’s.  All of the people on the float are wearing black masks for some reason, making them  even more scarey.   The man on the podium is giving someone in the krew the key to the city.  I have seen some other photos similar to this one, but not with the key to the city being handed over.  The man doing the handing could either be the Mayor of Pensacola or maybe the City Manager … someone important for sure.  Who knows, it might even be a relative to Quint Studer or some other mover and shaker back then,  If anyone knows anything about this photo or anything from this era, please share it with us.  I am curious about this one.  I also hope everyone is enjoying their Mardi Gras Tuesday and will make it to church tomorrow for Ash Wednesday, if they are not too hung-over.  As always, all comments are welcomed and appreciated and please check back … Frank

One more thing, my father did not take this photo.  I just had a copy negative that I scanned for this image.  Someone must have brought him the photo to copy and make prints.  If anyone has any idea who the photographer was, please let me know.  Most photographers from this era put their mark somewhere on the print to identify the photographer / artist, but this print did not.  I am sure that it was photographed with a view camera because of the sharpness.  The photographers back during this time names could have been ” Bell “, ” Turpin ” and ” Cottrell ” and would have had their names somewhere on the negative or print if they had made the image.  Thanks again ….

Escambia County Commissioners …

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IMG_3936 Escambia County Commisioners 1920's_RTP _SFW

This is a photograph of the Escambia County Commissioners.  The year is unknown … but if I had to guess, I would say sometime in the 1920’s.  One of these men was my grandfather, H.B. Hardy’s  brother – L.W. Hardy.  I do not know which one he was.  The purpose of posting this photo is to show how things got done ninety years or so ago … a group of men sat down at an old wooden table, in old wooden chairs talking to one another, face to face.  Anyone that wanted to sit in and listen could just take a seat in a line of chairs against the back wall.  If you had a question, you asked it… Sunshine Law, you mean they needed a law to let the sun shine in?  I bet they would even let a reporter from the paper sit in, and if he brought along a box of cigars, he might even be allowed to ask a question.  Doing business with the county commissioners has certainly changed a lot in the last ninety years.  No longer is it how can we help you, the taxpayer, but what can you, the taxpayer, do for your county commissioner?  What, no cash donation at election time?  Money talks … yes, if you want my attention, there is something you can do to get me to pay attention .  If anyone knows anything about the photo above, please share it with us.  I do not know if this photo is even hanging up down at the Escambia County Courthouse somewhere … so if you can tell me that, also, please do.  Thanks for looking and please check back … Frank

And Let The Sun Shine In ….

P. K. Younge Elementary School …

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IMG_0224  P K Younge _ RTP_ 20 Dec 13  SFW

This  photo is one that I had copied years ago for someone and I ran across it recently.  My father and his brother used to walk to school here back in the 1920’s … now let me tell you where they used to walk from.  When my father’s family moved to Pensacola in 1925, they moved to Reus and Garden Streets, where my grandmother ran a rooming / boarding house,  So may father and his brother would walk 5 blocks down Garden Street to Palafox Street, where they would turn left and head north ( I believe in an earlier post, I show this intersection of Garden and Palafox where there was a watering fountain for horses in the middle of the intersection … I will check on this to be sure ).  So they turn up Palafox, walk by the old San Carlos Hotel and keep on walking up the hill to Cervantes.  They cross over Cervantes Street and keep walking another 8 or 9 blocks until reach this school.  My dad said that he and Ben walked every day, rain or shine and never missed a day.  He also said that when they left their house it was just him and Ben, but by the time they got to school, they had been by joined by 20 or so kids.  I have a photo somewhere of him and his fifth grade class sitting on the steps of the school.  And that brings me another story …

In his class was a kid named Shelby and Shelby lived with his grandparent’s somewhere near the school in North Hill.  My dad said he thought it was North Hill, because it did not take him as long to walk to school as it took him and Ben.  My father would later show me the photo of the class  and I think that he had the names of all the kids on the back of the photo, but he would usually just single out Shelby,  unless he was talking about someone else he might have run into from that era.  Fast forward 55 years or so and by this time I was working with my father at the studio and the photo rings and I answer ” Frank Hardy Studio “.  This voice on the other end says in this long, Southern drawl ” Fraaank this is Sheeelby from ol’ PK Younge ”  and I said something like ” Glad to hear you Shelby … How are you doing? … You sound good ” .  Shelby then says ” You sound mighty good too Frank,  for being so old “, I laughed and  said  ” Hold on Shelby and I will  transfer you up front  to my dad, I am back in the darkroom printing” .   He then said, and I never forgot this,  ” I only went to PK Younge for a while and your father was one of the few kids that I really got to know and he was always nice to me and I never forgot that “.  They talked for an hour or so and when I noticed that the call was finished,  I walked out front and asked my dad who that hillbilly was and he said ” That was Shebly Foote and I guarantee you, he is no hillbilly “.  He told me that Shelby became a writer and later wrote books on the Civil War that  on which he became a noted authority.  My father  wrote him a letter through his publisher and had included that class photo of their PK Younge class.  Shelby said that he had never seen that photo before and was so happy to have a copy.  Several weeks later later a package arrived from New York … Shelby had sent my father his Civil War Trilogy series  and on the inside flap he had inscribed something like ” To my old PK Younge buddy, Shelby Foote” .  Sometime in the future I will photograph the inscription and add it to this post and I will also post the class photo.  I should have been more prepared, I apologize, that it going to be one of my New Year’s Resolutions …

That is my PK Younge / Shelby Foote story … It is not much, but it just shows what type of person my father was.  Thanks for looking and as always, all comments are welcome and are appreciated … Frank

Written by Frank Hardy

December 28, 2013 at 5:28 pm

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