Frank Hardy Made My Photographs Two

Archive for the ‘Hardy Family’ Category

1930’s Delchamps Basketball Team …

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Delchamps BasketBall Team _10x8_RTP_14 July 15 _ SFW

Back in the 1930’s, my father worked at Delchamps Grocery store when it was located at the corner of Garden and Baylen Streets.  He played on their basketball team and he is the guy standing, second on the right side of the photograph.  This photo might have been taken between 1932 and 1934.  He graduated from PHS in 1934, so I know that it was not after that time.  The photo was taken in the old gym that was located on the corner of Baylen and Belmont Streets, but it is no longer there.  Note the walk-around that surrounds the court behind the backboard.  I scanned this photo years ago and have been looking for it because it has the names of all of the players written on the back.  I am sure that there are some “old-timers” out there that will recognize some of the names.  Carter Photography on Palafox in downtown Pensacola made the photograph, but I just put my tag on it for identification.  This is also the original tone of the photograph and I did not bother to alter the color just because it looked interesting to me.  If anyone has any photographs of this old basketball gym, I would like to see them.  I am not sure if the building might have been the original YMCA before it moved to it’s present location on Palafox, but if anyone knows please comment.  Thanks for looking and as always, all comments are welcomed and appreciated.  Check back … Frank

OK … I have found the back of the above photo with the name of the players:

Back of Basketball Photo _ 8x10_24 Aug 15 _ SFW

The names are as follows: from the left – Delmar Jones, Clarence Dannelly, Murdock Campbell, Albert Swain, Mr Roberds_Manager, Mr Aiken_Frank’s Boss, Albert McLellan, Frank Hardy, Jack Britton.

Some of the names of the players I recognize – McLellan, Campbell, Dannelly are all familiar to me.  If anyone recognizes any of the other names, let me know.  Thanks for looking and please check back … Frank

P. K. Younge Elementary School …

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IMG_0224  P K Younge _ RTP_ 20 Dec 13  SFW

This  photo is one that I had copied years ago for someone and I ran across it recently.  My father and his brother used to walk to school here back in the 1920’s … now let me tell you where they used to walk from.  When my father’s family moved to Pensacola in 1925, they moved to Reus and Garden Streets, where my grandmother ran a rooming / boarding house,  So may father and his brother would walk 5 blocks down Garden Street to Palafox Street, where they would turn left and head north ( I believe in an earlier post, I show this intersection of Garden and Palafox where there was a watering fountain for horses in the middle of the intersection … I will check on this to be sure ).  So they turn up Palafox, walk by the old San Carlos Hotel and keep on walking up the hill to Cervantes.  They cross over Cervantes Street and keep walking another 8 or 9 blocks until reach this school.  My dad said that he and Ben walked every day, rain or shine and never missed a day.  He also said that when they left their house it was just him and Ben, but by the time they got to school, they had been by joined by 20 or so kids.  I have a photo somewhere of him and his fifth grade class sitting on the steps of the school.  And that brings me another story …

In his class was a kid named Shelby and Shelby lived with his grandparent’s somewhere near the school in North Hill.  My dad said he thought it was North Hill, because it did not take him as long to walk to school as it took him and Ben.  My father would later show me the photo of the class  and I think that he had the names of all the kids on the back of the photo, but he would usually just single out Shelby,  unless he was talking about someone else he might have run into from that era.  Fast forward 55 years or so and by this time I was working with my father at the studio and the photo rings and I answer ” Frank Hardy Studio “.  This voice on the other end says in this long, Southern drawl ” Fraaank this is Sheeelby from ol’ PK Younge ”  and I said something like ” Glad to hear you Shelby … How are you doing? … You sound good ” .  Shelby then says ” You sound mighty good too Frank,  for being so old “, I laughed and  said  ” Hold on Shelby and I will  transfer you up front  to my dad, I am back in the darkroom printing” .   He then said, and I never forgot this,  ” I only went to PK Younge for a while and your father was one of the few kids that I really got to know and he was always nice to me and I never forgot that “.  They talked for an hour or so and when I noticed that the call was finished,  I walked out front and asked my dad who that hillbilly was and he said ” That was Shebly Foote and I guarantee you, he is no hillbilly “.  He told me that Shelby became a writer and later wrote books on the Civil War that  on which he became a noted authority.  My father  wrote him a letter through his publisher and had included that class photo of their PK Younge class.  Shelby said that he had never seen that photo before and was so happy to have a copy.  Several weeks later later a package arrived from New York … Shelby had sent my father his Civil War Trilogy series  and on the inside flap he had inscribed something like ” To my old PK Younge buddy, Shelby Foote” .  Sometime in the future I will photograph the inscription and add it to this post and I will also post the class photo.  I should have been more prepared, I apologize, that it going to be one of my New Year’s Resolutions …

That is my PK Younge / Shelby Foote story … It is not much, but it just shows what type of person my father was.  Thanks for looking and as always, all comments are welcome and are appreciated … Frank

Written by Frank Hardy

December 28, 2013 at 5:28 pm

Easter Portrait …

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I know that this photo is a little late or a little early depending how you look at it, however this is yours truly at around 3 or 4.  Which by the way would make this 1956 or 1957.  Notice that there is no backdrop in this photo … canvas and paper backdrops did not start until the 1960’s for some reason or another.  I thought that it was time for me to post some of my child photos, since I only have literally thousands of them, and I did not just want to post other people’s portraits.  I want to be an equal opportunity embarrasser ( I do not know if that is the correct word or not, but you get my point ).    Thanks for looking and you can save your comments ( just joking ) …

Written by Frank Hardy

July 12, 2012 at 10:30 am

Posted in 1950's, Hardy Family

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Frank Hardy Studio … Scotland?

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Someone ran across my blog from England earlier this month and emailed me asking if  I had any relatives in Scotland that were photographers.  He then went on to say that he had a family photograph made in Saltcoats Scotland and on the back is a stamp by a Frank Hardy from Promenade Studio, Saltcoats.  The photo was made back in the 1940’s and it was from a time that they had taken a vacation trip to Scotland.  Then he emailed me the front and back side of his photograph and I want to share them with you below:

As you can see, it is a nice portrait of a family on vacation … I like the painted backdrop that was used to show the ocean in background.  These types of portraits were very popular in these resort towns around the world.  In fact, it looks as if it could have been in Atlantic City New Jersey or some place like that in America.  The man who emailed me this asked if this Frank Hardy could be any relation to me and I told him that I seriously doubt it.  If anyone reading this blog ever runs across any other Hardy’s from Scotland, I would be interested in hearing from them, since this is the first time that I have heard of any.  When Pam and I went to Ireland several years back, I inquired around, but did not find any.

Thanks again for looking and as usual, all comments are welcome …

Written by Frank Hardy

January 29, 2012 at 1:17 pm

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